Skin

Our skin is actually the the largest organ of our body, serving both to protect our insides and hold us together but also a sense organ and a means of both taking in substances and excreting them. It is also a vital part of producing vitamin D through the action of sunlight.

Yet despite its importance, most of us do not take it very seriously unless there is a problem. We buy lip balm if we get cracked lips in the winter. Some use creams on their faces and sun screen and rather fewer of us use hand cream or skin balms on our hands. (I do this before and after working on the allotment.) I also use the skin balm that I make using wax from my own bees kept in Cambridge for my lips.

Some massage therapists, use synthetic creams because they give the right amount of friction for sports treatments. While I know of no evidence to suggest this might be harmful I do worry about this practice.

When I give massage, I use either raw coconut or raw Walnut oil. Both are nourishing to the skin and are ideal for acting as a medium to allow the essential oils to penetrate the skin and do their work. These essential oils enter the bloodstream much faster via their aroma though in smaller quantities.

A full body massage can be important in keeping the skin in good condition. When I did flying trapeze as a hobby, doing massage regularly helped prevent hard blisters on my hands that could rip off forming. Now it does the same for my using a scythe but it is good for the whole of the skin, not just hands, face and lips.

Why not treat yourself, just £45 for an hour’s session or £55 for 90 minutes to a massage that will nurture your skin and help you to keep in the condition you would wish for?